Housing

Our goal: Make housing affordable for everyone.

SPUR’s Five-Year Priorities:

• Reduce the cost of building housing to make it more affordable for everyone.

• Provide low- and middle-income residents with homes they can afford, and prevent displacement.

• Use housing as a tool for closing the racial wealth gap and leverage public investment to support wealth creation for low-income households.

SPUR Report

What It Will Really Take to Create an Affordable Bay Area

The San Francisco Bay Area’s lack of housing and limited affordability have significant ramifications for the people who currently live here, the people who once lived here but have been forced to move elsewhere and the people who used to be housed but now live on the street. These housing pressures are remaking the region’s diversity, culture, economy and environment.

SPUR Report

Model Places

Over the next 50 years, the San Francisco Bay Area is expected to gain as many as 4 million people and 2 million jobs. In a region where a crushing housing shortage is already threatening quality of life, how can we welcome new residents and jobs without paving over green spaces or pushing out long-time community members?

SPUR Report

Room for More

Our housing agenda for San José lays out 20 concrete steps the city can take to address the chronic housing shortage, ranging from fixing its planning process to finding more funding for affordable housing.

SPUR Report

8 Ways to Make San Francisco More Affordable

San Francisco is in the midst of an affordability crisis. Reversing the situation will require far-reaching changes to the city’s housing policies. But there are many things we can do at the local level to make San Francisco more affordable for the people who live here.

SPUR Report

A Housing Strategy for San Francisco

San Francisco’s unique culture is threatened by the high cost of housing. Unless we do something, the city will lose its artists, its progressive politics, its immigrants and its young people. This second edition of our Housing Strategy for San Francisco updates the policy reports that define SPUR's housing agenda.

Updates and Events


The View from Sacramento: State Legislators Share Their Priorities for the Coming Year

News /
The COVID-19 pandemic upended last year’s legislative session, and now legislators are making up for lost time with an ambitious set of proposed bills. Earlier this month, Senator Scott Wiener, Assemblymember David Chiu and Assemblymember Philip Ting joined SPUR and the San Francisco Housing Action Coalition for a conversation about the prospects and priorities for the coming legislative session.

Where Do We Go From Here? SPUR Sets New Vision and Long-Range Goals

News /
With vaccines rolling out and stable national leadership in place, we can trust that we will, eventually, reemerge from the COVID-19 pandemic. The question now is: Reemerge into what? To return to “normal” would be to reembrace a way of living that was neither sustainable nor equitable. To meet this moment, SPUR has articulated a bold vision statement and evolved our organizational mission.

California Legislators Introduce New Bills as 2021 Session Kicks Off

News /
Last Monday, the California State Legislature convened to swear in members and introduce the first bills of the 2021-2022 legislative session. Here’s a round-up of notable bills that have already been introduced, including some key bills SPUR will be tracking.

Bold Moves on Building Electrification in the San Francisco Bay Area

News /
The Bay Area’s three largest cities made headlines recently when they passed bold new rules to phase out fossil fuels in buildings. San José, San Francisco and Oakland now have plans to make most new construction all-electric. These actions will make the air cleaner to breathe and slash the region’s contributions to climate change.

SPUR urges the San José City Council to adopt a Neighborhood Tenant Preference Program

Policy Letter
SPUR urged adoption of a Neighborhood Tenant Preference Program for affordable housing. Jurisdictions such as the City and County of San Francisco and New York City have already adopted such programs for affordable housing developments that they subsidize with San Francisco providing a local resident preference for 40% of the units and New York City 50%.