people biking, walking and eating at outdoor tables on a street closed to vehicles

From Temporary to Transformative

Leveraging pandemic "slow streets" programs to usher in a new era for city streets

aerial photo of Oakland

Making Oakland Government Work

10 ways city governance can adapt to meet the needs of Oaklanders

People walking in Salesforce Park

Water for a Growing Bay Area

How the region can grow without increasing water demand

construction workers putting up scaffolding

SPUR's Platform for Economic Justice Advocacy

Creating a Bay Area where all people thrive

Regional Strategy 2021

Welcome to 2070

The SPUR Regional Strategy has landed

SPUR 2021 Impact Report

Impact Report /
SPUR's 2021 Impact Report highlights our key accomplishments over the past year, from sponsoring state legislation to engaging audiences on pressing topics like climate change and racial equity. We published more than 60 policy reports, briefs and letters and hosted over 11,000 guests at public events.

From Temporary to Transformative

SPUR Report
During the COVID-19 pandemic, cities across the country piloted shared public spaces and slow streets. In a matter of weeks, these temporary changes transformed city streets in ways that would otherwise have taken years. The crisis injected the planning process with a sense of urgency and a willingness to experiment. How can San Francisco and other cities make these changes permanent? SPUR's new report captures lessons learned and offers 18 recommendations for how to build on what's been started.

Making Government Work

SPUR Report
Many of the challenges Oakland faces are worsened by its unusual government structure, which makes it harder for the mayor, city council and other officials to do their jobs well. SPUR’s latest report diagnoses the problem and offers 10 recommendations for how the city can adapt its governance structure to better serve Oaklanders.

San José City Council Should Embrace a New Vision for Coyote Valley

News /
San José is on the cusp of deepening its commitment to growing up, rather than out. The city has a unique and critical opportunity to concentrate growth within its existing urbanized areas rather than sprawling further. But it will miss a critical opportunity unless the City Council accepts the recommendations of the Planning Department and the Envision San José 2040 General Plan Four Year Review Task Force related to Coyote Valley.

Bridging the Gap

SPUR Report
The Bay Area’s current system for collecting unpaid bridge tolls hurts hundreds of thousands of people across the region. This system disproportionately harms lower-income and working people by relying on punitive tools like fines, fees and car registration holds to promote toll payment. SPUR recommends steps to reduce the harms caused by the unpaid tolls system and begin to move toward an equitable tolling system.