Updates and Events


Housing as Infrastructure

SPUR Report
In the United States, housing is viewed as a financial asset — something to be bought, rented and sold. In other countries, housing is a human right, necessary for the health and well-being of every person. In these places, housing is affordable to a broad swath of the population, and homelessness is less prevalent. If we began to treat housing as infrastructure, what might the results look like in the Bay Area?

Housing the Region

SPUR Report
Imagine a Bay Area where our greatest challenge, the scarcity and expense of housing, has been solved. This may sound like an impossible dream, but it isn’t. Within the next 50 years, we can live in an affordable region. But only if we make significant changes, starting right now. SPUR's series Housing the Region defines the Bay Area's housing crisis and put forth concrete steps to build a better, more affordable region.

What It Will Really Take to Create an Affordable Bay Area

SPUR Report
The high cost of housing has come to define the San Francisco Bay Area. It dictates who gets to live here, which in turn dictates who gets to participate in the region’s economy and political process. This report, the first in a series, looks at why housing prices have escalated so dramatically, what the impacts of those escalating costs have been on residents and who has borne the brunt of those impacts.

SPUR Supports SB 44, Which Streamlines Environmentally Beneficial Transit Projects

Policy Letter
Large scale transit projects are frequently the targets of CEQA-based litigation, causing delays, higher costs and diminishing the usefulness of the project to the people who voted and paid for it. Through administrative and judicial streamlining, SB 44 creates certainty for transportation projects, while ensuring that community concerns continue to be heard and addressed in a timely fashion.

The Bigger Picture: Seven Ideas for Downtown San José

SPUR Report
SPUR’s Bigger Picture series proposes ideas for key locations in San Francisco, San José and Oakland. Each provides an opportunity to tackle major regional challenges through local planning processes. Our first report looks at the western side of downtown San José, where a major rail station expansion, a park re-envisioning process and a record number of proposed developments are signaling big changes for the neighborhood.

Ladders Out of Poverty

SPUR Report
Tens of thousands of households in the Bay Area struggle to pay their bills each month, a situation only worsened by the COVID-19 pandemic. The region should look to the promise of unrestricted cash transfer programs, which give people money with no specific requirements on how it is spent. SPUR looks at the successes of existing programs and offers five possible options to consider.