Issue 526 August 2013

New York vs. Silicon Valley?

Could the next big tech boom be happening in New York?
Today, Silicon Valley receives the country’s largest share of venture capital investment — but New York may be catching up. It’s not official economic development strategies that should worry the Bay Area. More important are the underlying fundamentals supporting New York City’s growth: its ability to attract talent, its urbanity and its existing industry mix. Read More »

The Subway Is Seamless

Transit envy? Yeah, maybe a little. New York’s subway has 468 stations, free transfers and operates 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.
Inspired by New York transit, we contemplate what it would mean to integrate Muni, BART, Caltrain and the Valley Transportation Authority. (Hint: 168 train stops in one fare control area.) Read More »

Time to Make Room

In New York, a third of all households are single people living alone; in San Francisco, it’s 38 percent. Why aren’t we designing housing for that demographic?
Innovative design solutions can better accommodate the changing — and sometimes surprising — demographics in cities, including a rising number of single people. In New York, a third of all households are single people living alone. In San Francisco, it’s 38 percent. Why aren’t we designing housing for that demographic? Read More »

Urban Field Notes: Thinking Big in the Big Apple

In cities, quality of life is shaped by much more than housing alone; how the public realm completes the picture is key.
In cities, quality of life is shaped by much more than housing alone; how the public realm completes the picture is key. Read More »

Member Profile: Gary E. Malazian

For this self-described “time philanthropist,” every day is another opportunity for edification.
For this self-described “time philanthropist,” every day is another opportunity for edification. Read More »

Taking It to the (Multimodal) Streets

In cities across America, the phrase “complete streets” has become a mantra. New York City is leading the way.
No longer a utopian pursuit, the accommodation of transit, biking and walking has become professional orthodoxy— and not by accident. In cities from coast to coast, including San Francisco, “complete streets” (as multimodal streets are often called) has become a mantra. Read More »

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