New SPUR Project: Designing With Nature for Sea Level Rise

News July 13, 2017
While many efforts are underway to assess the Bay Area’s vulnerability to climate change, there hasn’t been a framework for evaluating which strategies will be appropriate for our shoreline’s many different settings — from wetlands to recreational attractions to industrial sites. SPUR is launching a new project that will define different segments of the shoreline so that we can develop integrated adaptation strategies for each.

How 5 Megaprojects Could Add Up to One Easy Train Ride

News July 10, 2017
With so many transportation agencies in the Bay Area, different entities often end up planning and building pieces of the same project. That’s happening right now on a grand scale: There are no less than five megaprojects taking place between San Jose and Oakland. If planned right they could add up to much more than the sum of their parts.

Putting the “Me” in Transit: Six Tools to Figure Out What Riders Want

News June 28, 2017
What would it look like if we put people at the center of transit planning — if we designed a friendly system grounded in the needs, wants and preferences of all riders? Would transit be more useful? Would more people ride it? To help transportation planners understand riders as customers, SPUR recently hosted the third annual Transit + Design Workshop.

Remaking Diridon: Principles to Plan and Grow By

News June 22, 2017
Over the next decade, more than $10 billion of transportation investments will start to remake San Jose’s Diridon Station into the first high-speed rail station in the country and the busiest transportation hub west of the Mississippi. This historic opportunity has the potential to reshape the entire South Bay. SPUR proposes seven principles that should guide planning, land use and transportation decisions at Diridon.

HOME-SF: New Law Aims to Spark More Affordable Housing

News June 21, 2017
Last month, San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee signed the HOME-SF program into law. The new law encourages housing developers to provide 30 percent of new units to low- and moderate-income households in exchange for permission to build bigger. The program will help to fill San Francisco’s growing need for housing, particularly for middle-income households that have not been well-served in the past.

Support Our Work

Become a member today

Join SPUR