Downtown Oakland

Building the Future Together

Our Goals for SPUR’s Work in Oakland

Construction in the Bay Area

Investing in City Infrastructure

Investing in America's future

Correctional Facility Food

Alameda County Joins a Growing Movement

Buying Better Food

Bay Area Parking

Why California Has Too Much Parking

How It’s Making Climate Change and the Housing Crisis Worse

St. John Street

The Bigger Picture

Seven Ideas for Downtown San José

Coexistence in Public Space

Creating shared spaces in places with homelessness

The SPUR Regional Strategy

Planning for the Bay Area of 2070

Alameda County Joins a Growing Movement to Buy Better Food

News /
Alameda County correctional facilities spend more than $20 million annually on food, but until recently there was no way to evaluate whether these purchases lived up to county’s values. This changed last month, when the Alameda County Board of Supervisors approved the Good Food Purchasing policy to see how well their food purchasing supports a healthy, local, sustainable and fair food supply chain.

How Do Fines and Fees Hurt Californians — and What Can the State Do About It?

News /
Fines and fees are an often-overlooked aspect of California’s criminal legal system. A recent SPUR forum took a close look at the role these charges play in a starkly inequitable, illogical and unjust system. Our panelists discussed the harms caused by fines and fees, why they cost too much, who they impact most and how to end biased enforcement.

Ladders Out of Poverty

SPUR Report
Tens of thousands of households in the Bay Area struggle to pay their bills each month, a situation only worsened by the COVID-19 pandemic. The region should look to the promise of unrestricted cash transfer programs, which give people money with no specific requirements on how it is spent. SPUR looks at the successes of existing programs and offers five possible options to consider.

Where Do We Go From Here? SPUR Sets New Vision and Long-Range Goals

News /
With vaccines rolling out and stable national leadership in place, we can trust that we will, eventually, reemerge from the COVID-19 pandemic. The question now is: Reemerge into what? To return to “normal” would be to reembrace a way of living that was neither sustainable nor equitable. To meet this moment, SPUR has articulated a bold vision statement and evolved our organizational mission.

Coexistence in Public Space

SPUR Report
As more and more Bay Area residents find themselves without homes, many have defaulted to living in public parks, plazas and squares. For other users of these spaces, the presence of unhoused residents renders them unwelcoming or even unsafe. How might we design and manage public space for coexistence, so that people of all backgrounds can find joy, belonging and safety there?