Blog

BY COLE ARMSTRONG
May 31, 2011
 

A recent editorial by the Regional Plan Association cites this sobering stat (from the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers) to make the argument for a higher tax on gasoline as a way to both reduce carbon emissions and raise revenues in a time of huge fiscal shortfalls.

BY ANIKA JESI
May 27, 2011
 

Seattle is consistently ranked one of the nation's most bikeable and walkable cities, with low pedestrian fatality rates, bicycle-friendly legislation and a high percentage of commuters who bike or walk to work.

BY COLE ARMSTRONG
May 24, 2011

San Franciscans have been throwing compostable waste into the “third bin” for 15 years now, since we began a composting pilot program in 1996. But anyone who thinks the third bin has only tertiary importance should know that since its beginning, San Francisco’s composting program has offset 354,600 metric tons of greenhouse gasses, equivalent to the emissions of all vehicles crossing the Bay Bridge for over two years.

BY COLLEEN MCHUGH
May 23, 2011

One of the greatest allures of a smart phone is the time it saves at the bus stop. Having real-time transit info and nearby stop locations at your fingertips makes city living just a little easier. But popular transit apps are just the beginning. Increasingly, smart phone technology is fundamentally changing the way we physically experience our cities.

BY ANIKA JESI
May 20, 2011

Mark Bittman of the New York Times calls Detroit a model of "self-reliance and growth," citing the residents ability to look within the city for solutions to challenges posed by a shrinking population. The key to Detroit's recent successes, Bittman argues, is food.

BY MICAH HILT
May 17, 2011

Tomorrow night, we open "Adapt!" an exhibition on the coming effects of climate change in the Bay Area. The show highlights key points from a SPUR policy report released earlier this month, which explains the kinds of changes we can expect to our climate — and what we need to do now to prepare.

MICAH HILT
May 13, 2011
Compare this to the national picture: only 8.7% of U.S. household don't have cars. While we're certainly ahead of most parts of the country on carfree living, this still means that more than two thirds of San Francisco households do own a car -- and a higher percentage of San Franciscans, 38.9%, use their cars to drive alone to work.
-BY COLE ARMSTRONG AND ELIZABETH HOEHNKE
May 12, 2011

SPUR’s 31st annual Good Government Awards, held earlier this year, honored five City of San Francisco employees and teams who have performed exceptionally, becoming models for other agencies and cities around the country.

BY PETER ENZMINGER
May 10, 2011

SPUR has made the case that an expanded bike network gives residents a safer option to add exercise and subtract carbon from their transportation diet.

BY GRETCHEN HILYARD
May 9, 2011

All eyes are on San Francisco's waterfront, as the city prepares for the 34th America's Cup, to be held in San Francisco in 2013. The recent release of Port City: The History and Transformation of the Port of San Francisco, 1848-2010, provides the opportunity to look back at the long and varied evolution of the eastern edge of the city as we envision its future.

BY ANIKA JESI
May 9, 2011
 

In an effort to densify single-family neighborhoods and increase the affordable housing stock in the city,  Seattle has begun a new rezoning project to allow homeowners to build stand-alone cottages in the yards behind their residences.

May 9, 2011

On May 4 SPUR released a major report, "Climate Change Hits Home," that lays out what the Bay Area must do to start preparing for the coming effects of climate change. This project, a multi-year effort by a team of top climate scientists and government leaders, represents a turning point for SPUR.

By Karen Steen
May 3, 2011

The back window of our office here at SPUR looks out on a building with an entertaining tenant, a green Pacific Parrotlet who has free range of his studio apartment and an impressive collection of plastic toys. After observing his activities, we became curious about our feathered neighbor and Tweeted him the old-fashioned way. We taped a note up in the window:

Hi green bird!
We think you’re awesome.
What’s your name?

BY ANIKA JESI
May 2, 2011
 

Adaptive reuse has long been praised for being a sustainable form of development that reduces waste, uses less energy, and scales down on the consumption of building materials. However, beyond these environmental benefits, reuse projects may also have the ability to foster a greater sense of community and provide a springboard for the economic growth of a neighborhood.

BY STEPHEN TU
April 26, 2011

Tomorrow, April 27, the Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC) will vote on a final Committed Funds and Projects Policy for Plan Bay Area. This policy mouthful is an important step in defining which regional transportation projects will receive funding and which ones must undergo more thorough analysis.

BY ANIKA JESI
April 22, 2011
 

In the past decade, the population of Raleigh, North Carolina, has grown faster than almost any major metropolitan area, earning it the less-than-desirable nickname "Sprawleigh." In response to its reputation for bad urban sprawl, city officials have begun extensive rezoning efforts for Raleigh's 2030 Comprehensive Plan.

BY COLE ARMSTRONG
April 19, 2011

SPUR’s 31st annual Good Government Awards, held earlier this year, honored five City of San Francisco employees and teams who have performed exceptionally, becoming models for other agencies and cities around the country.

BY MICAH HILT
April 19, 2011
SF Supervisor Scott Wiener led a tour of District 8 on April 14.
April 11, 2011
California’s continued population growth was not up for debate at the SPUR Urban Center on March 29, but the Saltworks development project in Redwood City certainly was.
By Jordan Salinger
April 8, 2011
After lying dormant for a decade, San Francisco International Airport's Terminal 2 will be re-opening this month.
BY ANIKA JESI
April 8, 2011
MinnPost.com photo by Steve Berg

Skyways -- enclosed, elevated sidewalks -- have protected pedestrians from the brutal weather in Minneapolis and St. Paul for decades. But these 1970s relics have also been accused of killing pedestrian activity on city streets.

BY STEPHEN TU
April 6, 2011

After threats to reduce service by nearly half, Caltrain officials last night agreed to scale back their drastic proposed cuts. The rail system’s governing agencies have brokered a deal to avoid the worst-case scenario, which would have run only 48 trains on weekdays, a dramatic drop from the current 86.

BY GABRIEL METCALF AND JENNIFER WARBURG
April 4, 2011

While the Bay Area is still climbing out of the great recession, we’re simultaneously experiencing the makings of a second dot-com boom. The Chronicle reports that tech jobs have climbed near to their year 2000 peak of 34,116. Silicon Valley is hiring again. And so is San Francisco.

POSTED BY JENNIFER WARBURG
April 4, 2011
 

Known for its quality of life and access to nature, Seattle has long prided itself on refusing to be “world class.” But rapid growth and a diversifying population mean Seattle is changing — whether it wants to or not.

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