The SPUR Plan to Solve the MTA Budget Crisis—without Service Cuts or Fare Increases

BY BEN LOWE
February 26, 2010
In response to the looming budget deficits faced by the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency, SPUR Executive Director Gabriel Metcalf today sent a letter to the MTA outlining a set of measures that could balance the budget this year and next, while avoiding service cuts and fare hikes.  The twenty-eight proposals include a diverse range of ideas including hiring part-time operators ($6 million in savings), routing 311 information calls to 511 ($5.5 million), and enforcing existing parking regulations around city facilities ($1.3 million).  The proposals, if adopted, would save MTA more than $104 million over the next two years.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/cbcastro/193831981/

 [Image: flickr user cbcastro]

These 28 proposals are not the only methods that could be implemented to immediately close the MTA budget deficit.  Metcalf also has noted the changes that must be made to the work rules under which Muni drivers currently operate, most recently in an open letter to the Transit Workers Union:

“[Problematic work rules] include: drivers not having to let their managers know how long they will be absent from work, making it impossible to set schedules; drivers earning overtime pay before actually working 40 hours a week; and perhaps most significantly, a set of rules that makes it virtually impossible to hire part time drivers. Currently, Muni is forced by the work rules to pay drivers at full hourly rates to sit around between the morning and afternoon peaks. That rule costs MTA about $11 million each year.”

As reported by Streetsblog, SPUR is working with SF Supervisor Sean Elsbernd to draft a measure that would revise the City Charter to have Muni drivers collectively bargain for pay and benefits, giving the City stronger footing to address these work rules.

As Metcalf said in his letter to the MTA, “none of these budget solutions will be easy, but we believe all of them are realistic.  They would begin to set up the MTA for growth rather than contraction in providing transit service to San Francisco.”

 

 Click here to read the twenty-eight options in the SPUR MTA Budget Proposal.