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By Micah Hilt
August 15, 2011

It came and it went, but Los Angeles as we know it did not come to a terrible end. Carmageddon — the 52-hour, 10-mile shutdown of the 405 freeway last month —passed quietly into history, becoming one of L.A.’s lightest traffic days ever.

By Casey Jung
August 11, 2011

A glimpse into biking through San Francisco debuts this week on Market Street. As part of its Public Arts program, the San Francisco Arts Commission will display its second installment of the popular Market Street poster series, which puts art in select bus shelters.

By Cole Armstrong and Micah Hilt
August 10, 2011

The Yerba Buena neighborhood already features museums, parks, an arts center and a convention center (as well as SPUR world headquarters), but starting this week there's something new to see: six new mobile parks, called “parkmobiles.” The first of their kind, the parkmobiles will be a shared resource in the community.

By Will Heywood
August 9, 2011

SPUR’s basement archive is a treasure trove of vintage planning reports and books. To make these documents available in digital format, we are daylighting the more interesting artifacts on our blog. Today’s find: Market Street Design Report Number 4, published May 9, 1966.

BY JILLIAN BURNS
August 5, 2011

Across the country, cities have realized the urgent need to invest in renewable energy sources. Solar panel installations in San Francisco have grown from 551 in 2007 to more than 2,400 today, largely due to city, state and federal incentives for residents and businesses.

BY Jeffrey Tumlin
August 4, 2011

For the July issue of the Urbanist — on how to transform Market Street — we asked Jeffrey Tumlin, principal at transportation planning firm Nelson\Nygaard, to take us on a tour of Market Street's history. To learn about plans for Market Street today, read the July Urbanist.

By Justin Baker Rhett
July 28, 2011

In Los Angeles, the City Council voted unanimously to put an end to its traffic enforcement camera program.  The program, which used cameras to identify drivers who ran red lights at city intersections, had cost Los Angeles 1.5 million dollars a year due to unpaid tickets. On top of the financial issues, studies raised doubt as to whether or not the program was effective in reducing the number of accidents on L.A.

By Eli Zigas, Food Systems and Urban Agriculture Program Manager
July 26, 2011

It’d be unthinkable to ban dogs, cats, and many other types of pets in cities. But if you want to raise other types of animals (like chickens, ducks and rabbits) for their eggs or meat, you might run into a lot more regulation.

by Ben Grant, Public Realm and Urban Design Program Manager
July 22, 2011

On July 13, the California Coastal Commission unanimously denied a permit application from the City and County of San Francisco for coastal armoring along the Great Highway South of Sloat Boulevard. The application was submitted by the City's Department of Public Works, which is responsible for the protection of city infrastructure, including the Lake Merced Tunnel, a 14-foot diameter sewer pipe under the Great Highway.

BY Justin Baker Rhett
July 22, 2011

In an effort to combat major gridlock in Midtown Manhattan, New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg and city transportation officials introduced a 1.6 million dollar program to improve traffic in one of the city’s most congested areas.

By Noah Christman and Karen Steen
July 21, 2011

Taking down a show at the SPUR Urban Center Gallery is always a sad moment. An exhibition is one of the best ways to de-nerdify our policy research and make it accessible to a wide audience. But once it comes down from our walls, we lose that public window into our work. So when we heard about Microsoft’s Photosynth technology, we got excited. Photosynth creates a virtual environment by collaging together hundreds of very high resolution photos.

By Eli Zigas, Food Systems and Urban Agriculture Program Manager
July 19, 2011

L.A.’s highly hyped “carmageddon” — the two-day closure of the 405 freeway — was not the apocalypse many feared. But it did provide a great showdown of transit alternatives.

In the starting gates were: bikes, mass transit and a plane (chartered by gimmick-savvy Jet Blue).

By Sarah Karlinsky, Deputy Director
July 18, 2011

The stretch of 4th Street between Market Street and the Caltrain station at 4th and King Street may not be one of San Francisco’s best-known neighborhoods (at least not yet), but it’s an important area for urbanists to be thinking about. Why? Because roughly $1.5 billion will be invested in transit infrastructure here, in the form of the Central Subway. The SF Planning Department has launched a Central Corridor Study...

By Eli Zigas, Food Systems and Urban Agriculture Program Manager
July 17, 2011

We are what we eat.  It’s true for people — but also for cities and regions. The food we consume and the system that produces, distributes and disposes of it are as vital to San Francisco and the Bay Area as our systems for housing, energy, water and governance. That's why SPUR has launched a new Food Systems and Urban Agriculture policy program that will strengthen both the food system within the city and the region’s network of farms and distributors.

By Sarah Karlinsky, Deputy Director
July 17, 2011

This year has been a wild one for redevelopment agencies in in California. First California voters passed Proposition 22, which prevented the state from raiding redevelopment agency funds. Then Governor Jerry Brown vowed to abolish redevelopment agencies and got fairly close to doing so. Now redevelopment agencies have once again headed to the chopping block, only this time it’s for real.

By Micah Hilt
July 12, 2011

 

In the history of San Francisco city planning, 2011 may go down as the year of the parklet. The idea to make streets more livable by converting parking spaces into public places debuted in SF in 2010, thanks to the city’s ...

BY MICHAEL BARKER
July 11, 2011

Since President Obama launched his Open Government Directive in December 2009, tech-savvy urban thinkers have been asking, "How can technology improve government and empower communities?" Although the Open Government Initiative suffered a hit when its funding was cut from $35 million to $8 million, nonprofits around the

BY JUSTIN BAKER RHETT
July 7, 2011
After suffering from the crippling effects of urban decay for decades, Newark, New Jersey city officials, lead by Mayor Cory A. Booker, are facilitating the development of 700 million dollars worth of construction projects in Newark this year.
By Sarah Karlinsky, Deputy Director
July 7, 2011

There's been a lot of hullabaloo about San Francisco's Mid-Market area lately, mostly focused on the new payroll tax exemption for businesses that locate in the neighborhood and the planned CityPlace Project, a major retail development, both approved by the city last September. But a gaggle of planners and economic development...

BY WILL HEYWOOD
July 5, 2011
When you live in San Francisco, it can be easy to forget that your standard of living is not the norm for all Californians. Not everyone in our state has such easy access to the Pacific Ocean, cascading mountains, iconic skylines and Bluebottle Coffee.
By Laura Tam, Sustainable Development Policy Director
July 5, 2011
In the 1970s, we crossed a global threshold when the rate of human demand for ecological resources began to outpace the rate at which nature could provide them. Today, we consume the equivalent of 1.5 earths in terms of the resources we use and the natural systems we rely on to absorb our waste.
BY JUSTIN BAKER RHETT
June 30, 2011
While many American cities continue to make accommodations for cars in the evolution of their respective urban landscapes, major cities in Europe have taken the opposite approach, implementing urban development strategies that discourage car ownership and driving.  Employing methods such as closing streets to car traffic, desynchronizing streetlights and limiti...
BY COLLEEN MCHUGH
June 27, 2011
What would make a morning commute on BART a more enjoyable, engaging and productive experience? Bike repairs? Coffee and snacks? Book clubs? Short films? Spinning classes? Speed dating?
By Egon Terplan, Regional Planning Director
June 23, 2011

Work on Senate Bill 375, California's anti-sprawl legislation, continued last month with a joint meeting of the Metropolitan Transportation Commission and Association of Bay Area Governments. The question at hand: Should MTC and ABAG approve a set of five alternative growth scenarios to further analyze? ...

June 22, 2011

SPUR’s 31st annual Good Government Awards, held earlier this year, honored five City of San Francisco employees and teams who have performed exceptionally, becoming models for other agencies and cities around the country.

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